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Forum » The Earth is Growing...?

The Earth is Growing...?

Grim Reaper 8 years ago
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Opinions on plausibility of the theory?
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Idiota 8 years ago
The first thing I wonder is where the water came from, and why the earth was shaped as it is now.
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Pete 8 years ago
Huh. That actually got me thinking... I know its REALLY improbable... but what IF?
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Crazy 8 years ago
The water thing was a good question. Maybe the atmosphere used to be thicker? H2O is the combination of Hydrogen and Oxygen, where Hydrogen could've come from space and Oxygen was produced by plants? We should remember that the size of the Earth can change while the mass stays constant.

The thing i was surprised about was that the Atlantic ridge and the Himalayas were consistent with this theory. Both have been there from the beginning, with the splits in the Atlantic ridge clearly showing what the theory said it was showing. Expansion.

But the one thing that disproves the theory for me is the variety of mountain ranges. You see, according to the more accepted theory, all mountain ranges start life as something like the Himalayas or the Alps. Sharp, steep mountains with V-shaped valleys. But as time goes on, these mountains erode. They become less steep, smoother, round, actually hump-like. An ideal example would be the Scandinavian range. If this new theory was correct, all the mountain ranges would be like the Scandinavian range, because no new mountains are created, because the tectonic plates don't crash into each other, crumpling each other like gum wrapper.

Perhaps there's an explanation for this? I need more than a 10-minute flashy video that doesn't cite it's sources.
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E_net4 8 years ago
But well, even if it does grow, the growing speed is too low for us to be worried about the possibilities of Earth's growth.
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Grim Reaper 8 years ago
"E_net4" said:
But well, even if it does grow, the growing speed is too low for us to be worried about the possibilities of Earth's growth.
Yeah, and the Sun doesn't burn out in a couple of million years, so why even start to think about space travel now?
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The Gemini 8 years ago
The only thing that this theory is truly based on is the disproval of subduction, the theory that tectonic plates are pressed under each other. The film states that this does not and can not happen, because the magma is twice as dence as granite. Where the hell did these guys spent the last 100 years? That the plates are moving under each other is not only something some guys theorized on, this is infact visible along f.ex. the american west coast. It is true that magma is dencer than certain stone types, but this has nothing to do with subduction, since in the areas of subduction, magma sinks down towards the core thus giving space for the seabed.


Oh yea, this quote is from wikipedia. Guess the supporters of the Expanding Earth Theory forgot to mention this on purpouse:
The International Terrestrial Reference Frame for the Earth in 2005 actually shrank a very small amount (0.2 ppb which would be equivalent to a 5mm reduction of diameter) from the reference frame in 2000
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E_net4 8 years ago
"Grim Reaper" said:
"E_net4" said:
But well, even if it does grow, the growing speed is too low for us to be worried about the possibilities of Earth's growth.
Yeah, and the Sun doesn't burn out in a couple of million years, so why even start to think about space travel now?
Yet, some people are developing more powerful thrusters for space travelling. I heard something about a special thruster that could send a space ship to mars in a week...
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Grim Reaper 8 years ago
"E_net4" said:
"Grim Reaper" said:
"E_net4" said:
But well, even if it does grow, the growing speed is too low for us to be worried about the possibilities of Earth's growth.
Yeah, and the Sun doesn't burn out in a couple of million years, so why even start to think about space travel now?
Yet, some people are developing more powerful thrusters for space travelling. I heard something about a special thruster that could send a space ship to mars in a week...
That's my frickin' POINT. We've got millions of years before we'll be burnt by the sun, yet people prepare for it.* Ergo, why not prepare for Earth's growth, assuming it's a fact?

Well, the point of the posts in reality was just to try and show you how pointless your first post ("even if it does grow" etc.).

* Yes, the burnout of the sun isn't the only thing. There's also overpopulation and all that jazz.
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E_net4 8 years ago
"Grim Reaper" said:
That's my frickin' POINT. We've got millions of years before we'll be burnt by the sun, yet people prepare for it.* Ergo, why not prepare for Earth's growth, assuming it's a fact?
Well, the point of the posts in reality was just to try and show you how pointless your first post ("even if it does grow" etc.) was.
This fact had to be mentioned sooner or later. It wasn't so pointless.
Back on topic, there isn't much to say, IMO.
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Crazy 8 years ago
Actually, we'll collide with Andromeda before the sun will begin to worry us.

And now THAT is a sticky situation.
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Idiota 8 years ago
There's no point in trying to do something about something that will happen in millions of years from now. Firstly, we're in now way sure that we'll even exist for that long, second, I'd like to refer to the book of books of SF, Discworld. In it, the Puppeteer race notices that the core of the milkyway suffered from a chain reaction of supernovae, which means gamma rays. They'd reach them in a million years, so in order to prevent that they started moving their homeworlds to a safe location at that time. The humans, however, remained where they were and escaped with a much better solution in less time (at least, they would have. It's not stated in the book that they did). In other words, think short term and everything will work out!
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MageKing17 8 years ago
"Idiota" said:
There's no point in trying to do something about something that will happen in millions of years from now. Firstly, we're in now way sure that we'll even exist for that long, second, I'd like to refer to the book of books of SF, Discworld. In it, the Puppeteer race notices that the core of the milkyway suffered from a chain reaction of supernovae, which means gamma rays. They'd reach them in a million years, so in order to prevent that they started moving their homeworlds to a safe location at that time. The humans, however, remained where they were and escaped with a much better solution in less time (at least, they would have. It's not stated in the book that they did). In other words, think short term and everything will work out!
Ringworld. Discworld is completely different.

Also, the Andromeda collision is unlikely to effect us here in the Sol system very much. After all, galaxies collide all the time without the individual stars being effected at all (beyond now orbiting differently). We'll most likely just congeal into a bigger galaxy.
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Idiota 8 years ago
"MageKing17" said:
"Idiota" said:
There's no point in trying to do something about something that will happen in millions of years from now. Firstly, we're in now way sure that we'll even exist for that long, second, I'd like to refer to the book of books of SF, Discworld. In it, the Puppeteer race notices that the core of the milkyway suffered from a chain reaction of supernovae, which means gamma rays. They'd reach them in a million years, so in order to prevent that they started moving their homeworlds to a safe location at that time. The humans, however, remained where they were and escaped with a much better solution in less time (at least, they would have. It's not stated in the book that they did). In other words, think short term and everything will work out!
Ringworld. Discworld is completely different.

Also, the Andromeda collision is unlikely to effect us here in the Sol system very much. After all, galaxies collide all the time without the individual stars being effected at all (beyond now orbiting differently). We'll most likely just congeal into a bigger galaxy.

Err...? I don't recall writing Discworld. o.O I never even read a book named Discworld... >.>
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Pete 8 years ago
"Idiota" said:
"MageKing17" said:
"Idiota" said:
There's no point in trying to do something about something that will happen in millions of years from now. Firstly, we're in now way sure that we'll even exist for that long, second, I'd like to refer to the book of books of SF, Discworld. In it, the Puppeteer race notices that the core of the milkyway suffered from a chain reaction of supernovae, which means gamma rays. They'd reach them in a million years, so in order to prevent that they started moving their homeworlds to a safe location at that time. The humans, however, remained where they were and escaped with a much better solution in less time (at least, they would have. It's not stated in the book that they did). In other words, think short term and everything will work out!
Ringworld. Discworld is completely different.

Also, the Andromeda collision is unlikely to effect us here in the Sol system very much. After all, galaxies collide all the time without the individual stars being effected at all (beyond now orbiting differently). We'll most likely just congeal into a bigger galaxy.

Err...? I don't recall writing Discworld. o.O I never even read a book named Discworld... >.>
Trust me, youre missing a lot of hilarious.(style of sentence intended)
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